If you suffer a severe burn, your healing should be the number one priority. In the United States, about half a million people require treatment for burns each year, explains the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public health.

Burns can range in severity from first to third degree. First degree burns affect the top layer of skin, second-degree burns affect the middle layer or dermis and third-degree burns affect the skin down to the fat layer.

Wrap the burn in plastic wrap

Seek medical attention if your burn causes you excruciating pain, if it is over a joint, on your hands and feet or over your face and neck. Do not ice your burn, as that can cause blood vessels to constrict. Instead, clean the wound if you can and wrap it in plastic wrap. The plastic wrap protects the burn and it will not stick painfully. Simple soap and water can clean the wound but if it is too painful, do not force yourself to clean it yourself.

Be wary of scabs and painless burns

Do not let a painless burn fool you into believing it is not serious. Painless burns may be more serious than painful burns. Deep burns have no sensation. They may have a leather texture; they may be pale yellow or white and dry. These burns may require skin grafts. Most burns will blister, but they should not scab. Blisters are a protective barrier where scabs may lead to scarring. When burns do not heal after two weeks, they may require more serious procedures such as skin grafts.