It is difficult for many people in Ohio to consider making significant decisions if they do not feel an immediate impact on their life. One such decision is the choice to write a will and have it legally notarized. Unless people are facing a significant event in their life, they may not see the value or purpose of articulating their final wishes in a legally sound document.

Some people put off writing a will because they do not deem it necessary at the moment or because it seems complicated and overwhelming. For others, the idea of thinking about their death may cause them to feel uneasy. However, people who are proactive about recording their end-of-life wishes may be able to have the peace of mind that their surviving family members will know what they wanted after they die. Additionally, having a will can provide clarification and even comfort for surviving family members as they make decisions after their family member’s death.

According to U.S. News, many people do not consider writing a will unless something major happens in their life. Examples of such events include the following:

  • The birth of a child.
  • Marriage or remarriage.
  • Witnessing the serious illness or death of a close family member or friend.

U.S. News also reminds people that a will pertains to assets that a person has that they may wish to give to someone else when they die. Things such as property, sentimental personal possessions and vehicles can all be appropriated through a will. However, pensions, brokerage accounts and any retirement benefits cannot be allocated to others this way and require specific beneficiary designations. People should regularly update their will to reflect changes in their family dynamic to ensure that the beneficiaries they have listed are still applicable overtime.